Monthly Archives:May 2017

ByIDGTF

Thank You

The 14th International Dublin Gay Theatre Festival ended last night with our Gala and Awards Night.  More news to follow on our winners and nominees!

Festival 2017 was the most successful for a number of years and we were happy to report higher average turnout at shows as well as multiple sold-out performances over the past 2 weeks.

We are also delighted with the results from our raffle – you contributed more than ever before and this will make a huge difference as we work towards 2018.

Why does this matter?

As a 100% not-for-profit, voluntary organisation, every cent earned during the Festival:

  • Supports our artists from Ireland and abroad and makes it possible to present diverse voices in theatre, including new writing and emerging talent.
  • Is invested in the local economy to maintain Dublin’s mantle as a major international centre of LGBT theatre – including arts venues, LGBT and tourism organisations.
  • Builds a foundation for next year so that we can bring more unique works to Dublin
  • Helps us to, literally, fly the flag for the LGBT community in Dublin and abroad, to proudly celebrate our identities.
  • To engage more people in the arts – as participants, volunteers and audience.  Every year it is fantastic to see new friendships, artistic collaborations and relationships grow at the Festival.

 

A big thank you…

There are many people we would like to thank as without their amazing support this event simply could not happen:

  • You the audience.  Without your support there would be no Festival.  We hope you were inspired and entertained.  In particular we would like to thank:
    • Our visitors from overseas.  From North America, to Europe, to Australia, your support of the Festival and of our artists makes a larger difference than you can realise.
    • The LGBT community groups who organised group bookings and supported our shows.  Our participants really appreciated your support.
  • Our participants.  Every year they make enormous sacrifices and bring incredible creativity, vision and performances to Dublin.  This year we were particularly delighted to present the largest ever selection of works by and about young people.  We can see that the future of LGBT theatre is very promising indeed.
  • Our volunteers.  Everyone involved in the Festival from the Board and Executive who worked throughout the year to build the event, our tech team, our Front of House volunteers.  It was a pleasure to work with familiar faces and to welcome new talent on board in 2017.
  • Our sponsors.  Thank you to the Arts Council, Dublin City Council, Fáilte Ireland and RTÉ Supporting the Arts for their invaluable support.
    • A big thank you to the LGBT businesses who supported us with ads in our programme, online reviews and coverage of the Festival and more.
    • In particular we would like to thank Hotel Westport for their generous donation of an weekend in their hotel in beautiful Westport.
  • Our venues.  Thank you to our venues for their assistance and support again this year.
    • We would also like to thank our Festival Club venues who made our participants and volunteers very welcome – Oscar’s Bar Christchurch, Street66, The George and Pantibar.
    • A huge thank you to SpireVision Studios, O’Connell Street for hosting our Box Office.  Our main Box Office was busier than ever and having such a fantastic location and generous hosts really contributed to that.

There are so many others that we would like to thank – including those who generously gave time, resources, equipment and expertise to the Festival throughout the year.

ByIDGTF

Review 2017: Love Trumps Everything / How We Glow

Love Trumps Everything *** How We Glow *****

(Review published in theoutmost.com.  Check out more Festival reviews at theoutmost.com here)

The appearance of Trump in the title Love Trumps Everything, has nothing to do with the orange man in the Whitehouse. Instead, it’s the thread that loosely binds three short plays where love overcomes life’s unavoidable obstacles. The first layer in this sandwich is Carolyn Gage’s ‘Calamity Jane Sends a Message to Her Daughter’, an intriguing story, brilliantly delivered by Maria Blaney and well directed by Philippa Alford. If it wasn’t altogether clear to me how this piece fitted into an LGBT festival, that’s no matter.

The sandwich filling is light. Kathleen Warnock gives us a personal insight into her journey to equal marriage with ‘How To Get Married in Five Steps and 17 Years’. And then, we are topped with Candice Perry’s ‘Made in Heaven’. This is a very amusing tale which suggests that in heaven, the big G will make sure we spend eternity with the right partner, even if it’s not who think it is!

Love Trumps Everything – ‘Made in Heaven’

A welcome accompaniment to these pieces is How We Glow, a cleverly crafted verbatim script woven from interviews with LGBT youth in New York. It is wonderfully performed by a bunch of bright, beautiful actors and certainly left me with reassurance that the kids really are alright.

Much credit to Jamila Humphrie and Emily Schorr Lesnick for this refreshing and important social document.

 

Brian Higgins

‘Love Trumps Everything’ and ‘How We Glow’ continue at the Teacher’s Club until May 13 at 7.30pm, with a matinee on Saturday at 2.30pm, tickets here

Save

Save

ByIDGTF

Saturday €10 Matinees on May 13 @ 2:30pm/4pm

Don’t miss our €10 Saturday matinees which take place at 2:30pm & 4pm.

With shows like Gypsy Queen selling out each evening and 5-star shows such as The Elephant Girls and Spool – this could be your last opportunity to see many of our shows.

Check out our Saturday schedule here.

The Elephant Girls

gypsyqueen_crop

ByIDGTF

Review 2017: Spool

Review – Spool

The Teachers’ Club 9pm until Sat May 13 (matinee: Sat 13 @ 4pm)

Written and Directed by Otto Farrant & Finn Cooke

Spool is an introspective analysis about what it’s like to be a young man.  Honest, candid and raw, it shows the inner-monologue that haunts every young man and the extreme pressure they can sometimes put themselves under.  These pressures often manifest themselves ten fold in gay men and it’s for that reason that this piece is a skillfully judged and important addition to an LGBT festival programme.

Finn Cook (Mind) is as skilled a poker-faced actor as Otto Farrant (Body) is a contemporary dancer.  Attached initially with a piece of rope, their use of expressive movement, where body ‘spools’ information to feed the mind is a joy to watch.  Ultimately, body and mind fall out and agree to separate, leading to a series of interpretive scenes that show just how important it is for Mind and Body to work together.

untitled_large1

Giving an intelligent nod to the working methods of Frantic Assembly and the early workings of The Marx Brothers, this is a well thought though and ridiculously originally piece of work.  Spool seems an unlikely context for a winning double-act, but these talented young men have the potential to be to theatre what Penn and Teller are to magic.

As important to starting a conversation about Mental Health issues in young men, as it is to emerging artists and original and unique performance style – Spool will impress and delight you and must be seen.

NW

May, 11 2017

Save

ByIDGTF

Review 2017: Lines in the Sand

Review – Lines in the Sand

By Jim Dalglish

Directed by Jim Dalglish & Ian Ryan

 The Pearse Centre 7:30pm until Sat May 13; €10 matinee @ 4pm Sat May 13

Without wanting to give anything away, Lines in the Sand achieves something unique.  The audience is left to wonder where the hell we are and what the hell is happening.  As we uneasily let our minds race in all directions, trying to second-guess the clever writing of Jim Dalglish is impossible.

Nick Bucchianeri (Boy) should be applauded.  A skilful and natural young actor, being given such layered and challenging material at such an age demonstrates how talented he really is.  Tony Travastino (Man) doesn’t go easy on him either and it’s his confident and unwavering approach, to play the truth of his character – without compromise, that grips you right from the opening scene.

Whilst cleverly twisting and turning, at times, Boy seems to break into heartfelt monologue with insight and knowledge way beyond his years and his character arc seems somewhat implausible at times, given that these events only happen over one night.  This really should be a full length production where character progression can be slowed, ensuring we see all the stages of how these two men deal with their unexpected meeting.

Where this play ultimately succeeds however is in is how it deals with the detail of what has happened surrounding this story.  As an audience, we are left to conjure up our own images.  It is this clever technique, utilizing the audience’s ability to imagine what they don’t want to imagine that raises the stakes, taking us with these characters and makes us care as if we were there.

A brave psychological thriller, Lines in the Sand explores the struggles of growing up gay and the dangers boys and young men face whilst they try to desperately ‘find a place where you aren’t afraid to be who you are inside’.

NW

ByIDGTF

Review 2017: The Elephant Girls

FESTIVAL REVIEW: The Elephant Girls runs at Outhouse until Saturday at 9pm Saturday matinee at 2.30pm.

Canadian Margo Mac Donald dons a mafia style pin strip suit to tells us the fascinating story of the East End of London’s notorious lesbian gang, which terrorised, lusted, controlled and rampaged through London for almost a century. Maggie Hale (Mac Donald) is our butch guide through the fascinating of power and criminality at a time when London’s underground pulsated with life, death and hidden passions.

Grappling and succeeding with a cockney accent, this super smooth no holds barred narrative is gripping, creepy and criminal. Directed by Mary Ellis we encounter Hale in a bar and after a few pints she begins to spill the beans on a century of secrecy that is a riveting as it is revealing. Beautifully and assuredly played, the gang undoubtedly did succeed and endure, if all its members packed a lunch like Mac Donald’s assured gender stretching performance delivered with charm and aplomb.

You will not know this story, but you will know the characters intimately by the time the story of the Elephant Girls concludes. It is a fascinating insight to a chapter of the hidden history of lesbianism condemned to the shadows and for far too long. The bright light shone by writer Mac Donald is truly illuminating – her performance memorable.

A must see. AO’B

ByIDGTF

Review 2017: Spool

FESTIVAL REVIEW: Spool runs at The Teachers Club until Saturday 9pm and Saturday has a matinee at 4pm.

Two handsome young men are tied together in a beautiful exploration of the pressures faced by young men in exploring modern masculinity. Engagement with social media can confuse and prioritise the physical self from the critical uniqueness of the individual – the emotional self.  How do you survive today if one dominates the other? Finn Cooke and Otto Farrant demonstrate how these two are different – one balletic, one literal, both are inter-dependent. Both sleep, wash, play, breath and dance together in perfect harmony. The pressures of modern existence become too much when one feels he can survive away from the other.

This is a blend of physicality, dance and intellect with some beautiful balletic moments, strong and humorous imagery, innocence and relevance. Farrant and Cooke shed all physical inhibition to blend, perform and flow together until cut in two. Can one survive just in body or just in mind in modern society where image is all and communication of the person’s value diminishing in a virtual world?

This melodic duet of body and mind is perfect for audiences of all ages – it explores masculinity in a beautiful form rarely seen and that is just one of the clever levels unmasked in this delightful gem developed by two young performers with a lot to say. Don’t miss it. GF